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Kofi Annan
Kofi Annan
Kofi Annan
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Ludwig Quidde
Ludwig Quidde
Ludwig Quidde
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Alfred Nobel
Alfred Nobel
Alfred Nobel
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Kofi Annan: Today, in Afghanistan, a girl will be born. Her mother will hold her and feed her, comfort her and care for her — just as any mother would anywhere in the world. In these most basic acts of human nature, humanity knows no divisions. But to be born a girl in today’s Afghanistan is to begin life centuries away from the prosperity that one small part of humanity has achieved. It is to live under conditions that many of us in this hall would consider inhuman.
Kofi Annan: Today, in Afghanistan, a girl will be born. Her mother will hold her and feed her, comfort her and care for her — just as any mother would anywhere in the world. In these most basic acts of human nature, humanity knows no divisions. But to be born a girl in today’s Afghanistan is to begin life centuries away from the prosperity that one small part of humanity has achieved. It is to live under conditions that many of us in this hall would consider inhuman.
Kofi Annan: Today, in Afghanistan, a girl will be born. Her mother will hold her and feed her, comfort her and care for her — just as any mother would anywhere in the world. In these most basic acts of human nature, humanity knows no divisions. But to be born a girl in today’s Afghanistan is to begin life centuries away from the prosperity that one small part of humanity has achieved. It is to live under conditions that many of us in this hall would consider inhuman.
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Kofi Annan: The rights of the individual are of no less importance to immigrants and minorities in Europe and the Americas than to women in Afghanistan or children in Africa. They are as fundamental to the poor as to the rich; they are as necessary to the security of the developed world as to that of the developing world.
Kofi Annan: The rights of the individual are of no less importance to immigrants and minorities in Europe and the Americas than to women in Afghanistan or children in Africa. They are as fundamental to the poor as to the rich; they are as necessary to the security of the developed world as to that of the developing world.
Kofi Annan: The rights of the individual are of no less importance to immigrants and minorities in Europe and the Americas than to women in Afghanistan or children in Africa. They are as fundamental to the poor as to the rich; they are as necessary to the security of the developed world as to that of the developing world.
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Kofi Annan: This thought is reflected in the Christian Gospel, which also teaches us to love our enemies and pray for those who wish to persecute us. Hindus are taught that “truth is one, the sages give it various names.” And in the Buddhist tradition, individuals are urged to act with compassion in every facet of life.
Each of us has the right to take pride in our particular faith or heritage. But the notion that what is ours is necessarily in conflict with what is theirs is both false and dangerous. It has resulted in endless enmity and conflict, leading men to commit the greatest of crimes in the name of a higher power.
It need not be so. People of different religions and cultures live side by side in almost every part of the world, and most of us have overlapping identities which unite us with very different groups. We can love what we are, without hating what — and who — we are not. We can thrive in our own tradition, even as we learn from others, and come to respect their teachings.
Kofi Annan: This thought is reflected in the Christian Gospel, which also teaches us to love our enemies and pray for those who wish to persecute us. Hindus are taught that “truth is one, the sages give it various names.” And in the Buddhist tradition, individuals are urged to act with compassion in every facet of life.
Each of us has the right to take pride in our particular faith or heritage. But the notion that what is ours is necessarily in conflict with what is theirs is both false and dangerous. It has resulted in endless enmity and conflict, leading men to commit the greatest of crimes in the name of a higher power.
It need not be so. People of different religions and cultures live side by side in almost every part of the world, and most of us have overlapping identities which unite us with very different groups. We can love what we are, without hating what — and who — we are not. We can thrive in our own tradition, even as we learn from others, and come to respect their teachings.
Kofi Annan: This thought is reflected in the Christian Gospel, which also teaches us to love our enemies and pray for those who wish to persecute us. Hindus are taught that “truth is one, the sages give it various names.” And in the Buddhist tradition, individuals are urged to act with compassion in every facet of life.
Each of us has the right to take pride in our particular faith or heritage. But the notion that what is ours is necessarily in conflict with what is theirs is both false and dangerous. It has resulted in endless enmity and conflict, leading men to commit the greatest of crimes in the name of a higher power.
It need not be so. People of different religions and cultures live side by side in almost every part of the world, and most of us have overlapping identities which unite us with very different groups. We can love what we are, without hating what — and who — we are not. We can thrive in our own tradition, even as we learn from others, and come to respect their teachings.
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Ludwig Quidde: The security of which we speak is to be attained by the development of international law through an international organization based on the principles of law and justice. So long as peace is not attained by law (so argue the advocates of armaments) the military protection of a country must not be undermined, and until such is the case disarmament is impossible.
Time and time again we have experienced efforts directed toward this popular and simple concept of securing peace by means of disarmament. The famous Rescript of the Czar in 18984 did not speak of organized international law, only of the necessity to restrict armaments. It was the criticism from the pacifists and from the Interparliamentary Union5 which brought about the inclusion of peaceful settlement of disputes on the agenda of the first Hague Conference.
That is a doctrinaire view which does not take the facts into account. Limitation of armaments in itself is economically and financially important quite apart from security. This argument is so well known and so often discussed that there is no need to linger over it. It will be sufficient to point to the enormous burdens which armaments place on the economic, social, and intellectual resources of a nation, as well as on its budget and taxes.
Ludwig Quidde: The security of which we speak is to be attained by the development of international law through an international organization based on the principles of law and justice. So long as peace is not attained by law (so argue the advocates of armaments) the military protection of a country must not be undermined, and until such is the case disarmament is impossible.
Time and time again we have experienced efforts directed toward this popular and simple concept of securing peace by means of disarmament. The famous Rescript of the Czar in 18984 did not speak of organized international law, only of the necessity to restrict armaments. It was the criticism from the pacifists and from the Interparliamentary Union5 which brought about the inclusion of peaceful settlement of disputes on the agenda of the first Hague Conference.
That is a doctrinaire view which does not take the facts into account. Limitation of armaments in itself is economically and financially important quite apart from security. This argument is so well known and so often discussed that there is no need to linger over it. It will be sufficient to point to the enormous burdens which armaments place on the economic, social, and intellectual resources of a nation, as well as on its budget and taxes.
Ludwig Quidde: The security of which we speak is to be attained by the development of international law through an international organization based on the principles of law and justice. So long as peace is not attained by law (so argue the advocates of armaments) the military protection of a country must not be undermined, and until such is the case disarmament is impossible.
Time and time again we have experienced efforts directed toward this popular and simple concept of securing peace by means of disarmament. The famous Rescript of the Czar in 18984 did not speak of organized international law, only of the necessity to restrict armaments. It was the criticism from the pacifists and from the Interparliamentary Union5 which brought about the inclusion of peaceful settlement of disputes on the agenda of the first Hague Conference.
That is a doctrinaire view which does not take the facts into account. Limitation of armaments in itself is economically and financially important quite apart from security. This argument is so well known and so often discussed that there is no need to linger over it. It will be sufficient to point to the enormous burdens which armaments place on the economic, social, and intellectual resources of a nation, as well as on its budget and taxes.

FF Kievit® Serif styles

Light
Regular
Book
Medium
Bold
Extra Bold
Black
Light Italic
Regular Italic
Book Italic
Medium Italic
Bold Italic
Extra Bold Italic
Black Italic
Light
Light Italic
Regular
Regular Italic
Book
Book Italic
Medium
Medium Italic
Bold
Bold Italic
Extra Bold
Extra Bold Italic
Black
Black Italic

Summary

FF Kievit® Serif subtlety melds oldstyle design traits and a 21st-century mien into a clean, straightforward suite of typefaces. As part of the FF Kievit superfamily it helps brands carry their voices effectively and legibly. This includes small text to display sizes, in both print and digital environments, for internal and external audiences. FF Kievit takes inspiration from classic designs like Garamond and Granjon and is available in seven weights, plus italics.

Drawn in collaboration with Paul van der Laan, FF Kievit Serif is a natural extension to the other members of the FF Kievit superfamily, which also includes FF Kievit and FF Kievit Slab. FF Kievit Serif stands on its own as a multi-talented and exceptionally legible design. Large counters, a generous x-height, and ample apertures ensure that FF Kievit Serif translates well to both hardcopy and interactive environments.

FF Kievit Serif is available in carefully defined weights, ranging from Light to Black. The Regular, Book, and Bold weights are ideally suited to long-form text copy. Ligatures, several suites of numbers, and small caps are also available. In addition, FF Kievit Serif benefits from the same extensive language support as the other designs in the family. Designed 2015–2019.

Credits & details

Purchase

Language support

Afar
Afrikaans
Albanian
Asturian
Azerbaijani
Basque
Belarusian
Bosnian
Breton
Catalan
Chichewa
Cornish
Corsican
Croatian
Czech
Danish
Dutch
English
Esperanto
Estonian
Faroese
Fijian
Finnish
French
Frisian
Friulian
Gaelic (Scottish)
Galician
German
Greenlandic
Hungarian
Icelandic
Indonesian
Irish
Italian
Karelian
Kazakh
Kinyarwanda (Ruanda)
Kirundi (Rundi)
Kurdish
Ladin
Latin
Latvian
Lithuanian
Luxembourgian
Malagasy
Malay
Maltese
Maori
Norwegian
Occitan
Oromo (Afan, Galla)
Papiamentu
Polish
Portuguese
Quechua
Rhaeto-Romance
Romani
Romanian
Samoan
Sardinian
Serbian
Shona
Slovak
Slovenian
Somali
Sorbian (Upper)
Spanish
Swahili (Kiswahili)
Swedish
Tagalog
Tahitian
Tsonga
Tswana
Turkish
Turkmen
Uighur
Walloon
Welsh
Wolof
Xhosa
Zulu