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Ελληνικά
Ελληνικά
Ελληνικά
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Scandinavian
Scandinavian
Scandinavian
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Spanjaard
Spanjaard
Spanjaard
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The northern lapwing (Vanellus vanellus), also known as the kievit or peewit, tuit, green plover, or (in Britain and Ireland) pyewipe or just lapwing, is a bird in the lapwing subfamily. It is common throughout the temperate Eurosiberia realm.
The northern lapwing (Vanellus vanellus), also known as the kievit or peewit, tuit, green plover, or (in Britain and Ireland) pyewipe or just lapwing, is a bird in the lapwing subfamily. It is common throughout the temperate Eurosiberia realm.
The northern lapwing (Vanellus vanellus), also known as the kievit or peewit, tuit, green plover, or (in Britain and Ireland) pyewipe or just lapwing, is a bird in the lapwing subfamily. It is common throughout the temperate Eurosiberia realm.
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It is highly migratory over most of its extensive range, wintering further south as far as North Africa, northern India, Nepal, Bhutan and parts of China. It migrates mainly by day, often in large flocks. Lowland breeders in westernmost areas of Europe are resident. It occasionally is a vagrant to North America, especially after storms, as in the Canadian sightings after storms in December 1927 and in January 1966.
It is highly migratory over most of its extensive range, wintering further south as far as North Africa, northern India, Nepal, Bhutan and parts of China. It migrates mainly by day, often in large flocks. Lowland breeders in westernmost areas of Europe are resident. It occasionally is a vagrant to North America, especially after storms, as in the Canadian sightings after storms in December 1927 and in January 1966.
It is highly migratory over most of its extensive range, wintering further south as far as North Africa, northern India, Nepal, Bhutan and parts of China. It migrates mainly by day, often in large flocks. Lowland breeders in westernmost areas of Europe are resident. It occasionally is a vagrant to North America, especially after storms, as in the Canadian sightings after storms in December 1927 and in January 1966.
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The northern lapwing is a 28–33 cm (11–13 in) long bird with a 67–87 cm (26–34 in) wingspan and a body mass of 128–330 g (4.5–11.6 oz).[10] It has rounded wings and a crest. It is also the shortest-legged of the lapwings. It is mainly black and white, but the back is tinted green. The male has a long crest and a black crown, throat and breast contrasting with an otherwise white face.
This is a vocal bird in the breeding season, with constant calling as the crazed tumbling display flight is performed by the male. The typical contact call is a loud, shrill “pee-wit” from which they get their other name of peewit. Displaying males usually make a wheezy “pee-wit, wit wit, eeze wit” during their display flight; these birds also make squeaking or mewing sounds.
It feeds primarily on insects and other small invertebrates. This species often feeds in mixed flocks with golden plovers and black-headed gulls, the latter often robbing the two plovers, but providing a degree of protection against predators. Like the golden plovers, this species prefers to feed at night when there is moonlight.
The northern lapwing is a 28–33 cm (11–13 in) long bird with a 67–87 cm (26–34 in) wingspan and a body mass of 128–330 g (4.5–11.6 oz).[10] It has rounded wings and a crest. It is also the shortest-legged of the lapwings. It is mainly black and white, but the back is tinted green. The male has a long crest and a black crown, throat and breast contrasting with an otherwise white face.
This is a vocal bird in the breeding season, with constant calling as the crazed tumbling display flight is performed by the male. The typical contact call is a loud, shrill “pee-wit” from which they get their other name of peewit. Displaying males usually make a wheezy “pee-wit, wit wit, eeze wit” during their display flight; these birds also make squeaking or mewing sounds.
It feeds primarily on insects and other small invertebrates. This species often feeds in mixed flocks with golden plovers and black-headed gulls, the latter often robbing the two plovers, but providing a degree of protection against predators. Like the golden plovers, this species prefers to feed at night when there is moonlight.
The northern lapwing is a 28–33 cm (11–13 in) long bird with a 67–87 cm (26–34 in) wingspan and a body mass of 128–330 g (4.5–11.6 oz).[10] It has rounded wings and a crest. It is also the shortest-legged of the lapwings. It is mainly black and white, but the back is tinted green. The male has a long crest and a black crown, throat and breast contrasting with an otherwise white face.
This is a vocal bird in the breeding season, with constant calling as the crazed tumbling display flight is performed by the male. The typical contact call is a loud, shrill “pee-wit” from which they get their other name of peewit. Displaying males usually make a wheezy “pee-wit, wit wit, eeze wit” during their display flight; these birds also make squeaking or mewing sounds.
It feeds primarily on insects and other small invertebrates. This species often feeds in mixed flocks with golden plovers and black-headed gulls, the latter often robbing the two plovers, but providing a degree of protection against predators. Like the golden plovers, this species prefers to feed at night when there is moonlight.
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Kievit’s eggs were an expensive delicacy in Victorian Europe, mentioned in Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited, about aristocratic British society in 1920–40. In the Netherlands, there is a historical competition to find the first kievit egg of the year (het eerste kievietsei). It is especially popular in the province Friesland. Gathering peewit eggs is prohibited by the European Union, but Friesland was granted an exception for cultural-historical reasons.
The Frisian exception was removed in 2005 by a regional Dutch court, which determined that the Frisian executive councillors had not properly followed defined procedure. As of 2006 looking for peewit eggs is permitted between 1 March and 9 April, though harvesting the eggs is now forbidden. In 2008 the first egg was found on 3 March, in Eemnes, Utrecht, and the first egg of 2009 was found on 8 March in Krabbendijke.
Over the last century, the first kievit egg has been found earlier and earlier in the year. This is ascribed to both increased use of fertiliser and climate change, causing the growth of grass needed for egg laying to occur earlier. The northern lapwing was declared the Republic of Ireland’s national bird by a committee of the Irish Wildlife Conservancy in 1990. In the Irish language it is called “little Philip”, supposedly a reference to Philip II.
Kievit’s eggs were an expensive delicacy in Victorian Europe, mentioned in Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited, about aristocratic British society in 1920–40. In the Netherlands, there is a historical competition to find the first kievit egg of the year (het eerste kievietsei). It is especially popular in the province Friesland. Gathering peewit eggs is prohibited by the European Union, but Friesland was granted an exception for cultural-historical reasons.
The Frisian exception was removed in 2005 by a regional Dutch court, which determined that the Frisian executive councillors had not properly followed defined procedure. As of 2006 looking for peewit eggs is permitted between 1 March and 9 April, though harvesting the eggs is now forbidden. In 2008 the first egg was found on 3 March, in Eemnes, Utrecht, and the first egg of 2009 was found on 8 March in Krabbendijke.
Over the last century, the first kievit egg has been found earlier and earlier in the year. This is ascribed to both increased use of fertiliser and climate change, causing the growth of grass needed for egg laying to occur earlier. The northern lapwing was declared the Republic of Ireland’s national bird by a committee of the Irish Wildlife Conservancy in 1990. In the Irish language it is called “little Philip”, supposedly a reference to Philip II.
Kievit’s eggs were an expensive delicacy in Victorian Europe, mentioned in Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited, about aristocratic British society in 1920–40. In the Netherlands, there is a historical competition to find the first kievit egg of the year (het eerste kievietsei). It is especially popular in the province Friesland. Gathering peewit eggs is prohibited by the European Union, but Friesland was granted an exception for cultural-historical reasons.
The Frisian exception was removed in 2005 by a regional Dutch court, which determined that the Frisian executive councillors had not properly followed defined procedure. As of 2006 looking for peewit eggs is permitted between 1 March and 9 April, though harvesting the eggs is now forbidden. In 2008 the first egg was found on 3 March, in Eemnes, Utrecht, and the first egg of 2009 was found on 8 March in Krabbendijke.
Over the last century, the first kievit egg has been found earlier and earlier in the year. This is ascribed to both increased use of fertiliser and climate change, causing the growth of grass needed for egg laying to occur earlier. The northern lapwing was declared the Republic of Ireland’s national bird by a committee of the Irish Wildlife Conservancy in 1990. In the Irish language it is called “little Philip”, supposedly a reference to Philip II.

FF Kievit® styles

Thin
Extra Light
Light
Regular
Book
Medium
Bold
Extra Bold
Black
Thin Italic
Extra Light Italic
Light Italic
Regular Italic
Book Italic
Medium Italic
Bold Italic
Extra Bold Italic
Black Italic
Thin
Thin Italic
Extra Light
Extra Light Italic
Light
Light Italic
Regular
Regular Italic
Book
Book Italic
Medium
Medium Italic
Bold
Bold Italic
Extra Bold
Extra Bold Italic
Black
Black Italic

Summary

FF Kievit® explores the synthesis of the sans serif form to the structure and proportions of a traditional Renaissance Roman such as Garamond or Granjon. Work began on the typeface in 1995 when Mike Abbink was a student at Art Center in California. The family spans nine weights and includes small caps, true italics, and multiple figure sets — everything necessary for creating sophisticated typographic systems. FF Kievit was recognized with an ISTD Award in 2001, and the same year was included in the ATypI’s prestigious list of best designs of the previous decade. FF Kievit was designed in 1995–2000.

In practice


FF Kievit was used as the global typeface in various FontFont Catalogues from 2002–2007

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Language support

Afar
Afrikaans
Albanian
Asturian
Azerbaijani (Cyrillic)
Azerbaijani
Basque
Belarusian (Cyrillic)
Belarusian (Latin)
Bosnian
Breton
Catalan
Chechen (Cyrillic)
Chichewa
Cornish
Corsican
Croatian
Czech
Danish
Dutch
English
Esperanto
Estonian
Faroese
Fijian
Finnish
French
Frisian
Friulian
Gaelic(Scottish)
Galician
German
Greek
Greenlandic
Hungarian
Icelandic
Indonesian
Irish
Italian
Kalmyk
Karachay-Balkar
Karelian
Kazakh
Kinyarwanda (Ruanda)
Kirundi (Rundi)
Kumyk
Kurdish
Ladin
Latin
Latvian
Lithuanian
Luxembourgian
Malagasy
Malay
Maltese
Maori
Norwegian
Occitan
Oromo(Afan,Galla)
Papiamentu
Polish
Portuguese
Quechua
Rhaeto-Romance
Romani
Romanian
Russian
Rusyn
Rutul
Samoan
Sardinian
Serbian (Cyrillic)
Serbian (Latin)
Shona
Slovak
Slovenian
Somali
Sorbian (Upper)
Spanish
Swahili(Kiswahili)
Swedish
Tagalog
Tahitian
Tsonga
Tswana
Turkish
Turkmen
Uighur
Walloon
Welsh
Wolof
Xhosa
Zulu