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Voluson E10
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F-15EX Eagle
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Wind Power
Wind Power
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No other American company can claim a heritage of innovation as deep and broad as GE. From Thomas Alva Edison’s first incandescent light bulb to the latest jet engine brimming with internet-connected sensors and 3D-printed parts, GE has pioneered technologies that have spurred world-transforming changes and improved the lives of billions.
No other American company can claim a heritage of innovation as deep and broad as GE. From Thomas Alva Edison’s first incandescent light bulb to the latest jet engine brimming with internet-connected sensors and 3D-printed parts, GE has pioneered technologies that have spurred world-transforming changes and improved the lives of billions.
No other American company can claim a heritage of innovation as deep and broad as GE. From Thomas Alva Edison’s first incandescent light bulb to the latest jet engine brimming with internet-connected sensors and 3D-printed parts, GE has pioneered technologies that have spurred world-transforming changes and improved the lives of billions.
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Tackling the urgent global priority that is climate change will require solving the energy trilemma of economic development, reliability and sustainability. People around the world deserve access to sustainable, affordable and reliable electricity, which is critical to reducing poverty and hunger and promoting access to education and health care. Doing this will require a combination of global action, national commitments and consistent policy and regulatory frameworks.
Tackling the urgent global priority that is climate change will require solving the energy trilemma of economic development, reliability and sustainability. People around the world deserve access to sustainable, affordable and reliable electricity, which is critical to reducing poverty and hunger and promoting access to education and health care. Doing this will require a combination of global action, national commitments and consistent policy and regulatory frameworks.
Tackling the urgent global priority that is climate change will require solving the energy trilemma of economic development, reliability and sustainability. People around the world deserve access to sustainable, affordable and reliable electricity, which is critical to reducing poverty and hunger and promoting access to education and health care. Doing this will require a combination of global action, national commitments and consistent policy and regulatory frameworks.
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During 1889, Thomas Edison had business interests in many electricity-related companies, including Edison Lamp Company, a lamp manufacturer in East Newark, New Jersey; Edison Machine Works, a manufacturer of dynamos and large electric motors in Schenectady, New York; Bergmann & Company, a manufacturer of electric lighting fixtures, sockets, and other electric lighting devices; and Edison Electric Light Company, the patent-holding company and the financial arm backed by J. P. Morgan and the Vanderbilt family for Edison’s lighting experiments.
In 1889, Drexel, Morgan & Co., a company founded by J.P. Morgan and Anthony J. Drexel, financed Edison’s research and helped merge those companies under one corporation to form Edison General Electric Company, which was incorporated in New York on April 24, 1889. The new company also acquired Sprague Electric Railway & Motor Company in the same year. The consolidation did not involve all of the companies established by Edison; notably, the Edison Illuminating Company, which would later become Consolidated Edison, was not part of the merger.
In 1880, Gerald Waldo Hart formed the American Electric Company of New Britain, Connecticut, which merged a few years later with Thomson-Houston Electric Company, led by Charles Coffin. In 1887, Hart left to become superintendent of the Edison Electric Company of Kansas City, Missouri. General Electric was formed through the 1892 merger of Edison General Electric Company of New York, and Thomson-Houston Electric Company of Massachusetts, with the support of Drexel, Morgan & Co. Both plants continue to operate under the GE banner to this day.
During 1889, Thomas Edison had business interests in many electricity-related companies, including Edison Lamp Company, a lamp manufacturer in East Newark, New Jersey; Edison Machine Works, a manufacturer of dynamos and large electric motors in Schenectady, New York; Bergmann & Company, a manufacturer of electric lighting fixtures, sockets, and other electric lighting devices; and Edison Electric Light Company, the patent-holding company and the financial arm backed by J. P. Morgan and the Vanderbilt family for Edison’s lighting experiments.
In 1889, Drexel, Morgan & Co., a company founded by J.P. Morgan and Anthony J. Drexel, financed Edison’s research and helped merge those companies under one corporation to form Edison General Electric Company, which was incorporated in New York on April 24, 1889. The new company also acquired Sprague Electric Railway & Motor Company in the same year. The consolidation did not involve all of the companies established by Edison; notably, the Edison Illuminating Company, which would later become Consolidated Edison, was not part of the merger.
In 1880, Gerald Waldo Hart formed the American Electric Company of New Britain, Connecticut, which merged a few years later with Thomson-Houston Electric Company, led by Charles Coffin. In 1887, Hart left to become superintendent of the Edison Electric Company of Kansas City, Missouri. General Electric was formed through the 1892 merger of Edison General Electric Company of New York, and Thomson-Houston Electric Company of Massachusetts, with the support of Drexel, Morgan & Co. Both plants continue to operate under the GE banner to this day.
During 1889, Thomas Edison had business interests in many electricity-related companies, including Edison Lamp Company, a lamp manufacturer in East Newark, New Jersey; Edison Machine Works, a manufacturer of dynamos and large electric motors in Schenectady, New York; Bergmann & Company, a manufacturer of electric lighting fixtures, sockets, and other electric lighting devices; and Edison Electric Light Company, the patent-holding company and the financial arm backed by J. P. Morgan and the Vanderbilt family for Edison’s lighting experiments.
In 1889, Drexel, Morgan & Co., a company founded by J.P. Morgan and Anthony J. Drexel, financed Edison’s research and helped merge those companies under one corporation to form Edison General Electric Company, which was incorporated in New York on April 24, 1889. The new company also acquired Sprague Electric Railway & Motor Company in the same year. The consolidation did not involve all of the companies established by Edison; notably, the Edison Illuminating Company, which would later become Consolidated Edison, was not part of the merger.
In 1880, Gerald Waldo Hart formed the American Electric Company of New Britain, Connecticut, which merged a few years later with Thomson-Houston Electric Company, led by Charles Coffin. In 1887, Hart left to become superintendent of the Edison Electric Company of Kansas City, Missouri. General Electric was formed through the 1892 merger of Edison General Electric Company of New York, and Thomson-Houston Electric Company of Massachusetts, with the support of Drexel, Morgan & Co. Both plants continue to operate under the GE banner to this day.
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During 1889, Thomas Edison had business interests in many electricity-related companies, including Edison Lamp Company, a lamp manufacturer in East Newark, New Jersey; Edison Machine Works, a manufacturer of dynamos and large electric motors in Schenectady, New York; Bergmann & Company, a manufacturer of electric lighting fixtures, sockets, and other electric lighting devices; and Edison Electric Light Company, the patent-holding company and the financial arm backed by J. P. Morgan and the Vanderbilt family for Edison’s lighting experiments.
In 1889, Drexel, Morgan & Co., a company founded by J.P. Morgan and Anthony J. Drexel, financed Edison’s research and helped merge those companies under one corporation to form Edison General Electric Company, which was incorporated in New York on April 24, 1889. The new company also acquired Sprague Electric Railway & Motor Company in the same year. The consolidation did not involve all of the companies established by Edison; notably, the Edison Illuminating Company, which would later become Consolidated Edison, was not part of the merger.
In 1880, Gerald Waldo Hart formed the American Electric Company of New Britain, Connecticut, which merged a few years later with Thomson-Houston Electric Company, led by Charles Coffin. In 1887, Hart left to become superintendent of the Edison Electric Company of Kansas City, Missouri. General Electric was formed through the 1892 merger of Edison General Electric Company of New York, and Thomson-Houston Electric Company of Massachusetts, with the support of Drexel, Morgan & Co. Both plants continue to operate under the GE banner to this day.
During 1889, Thomas Edison had business interests in many electricity-related companies, including Edison Lamp Company, a lamp manufacturer in East Newark, New Jersey; Edison Machine Works, a manufacturer of dynamos and large electric motors in Schenectady, New York; Bergmann & Company, a manufacturer of electric lighting fixtures, sockets, and other electric lighting devices; and Edison Electric Light Company, the patent-holding company and the financial arm backed by J. P. Morgan and the Vanderbilt family for Edison’s lighting experiments.
In 1889, Drexel, Morgan & Co., a company founded by J.P. Morgan and Anthony J. Drexel, financed Edison’s research and helped merge those companies under one corporation to form Edison General Electric Company, which was incorporated in New York on April 24, 1889. The new company also acquired Sprague Electric Railway & Motor Company in the same year. The consolidation did not involve all of the companies established by Edison; notably, the Edison Illuminating Company, which would later become Consolidated Edison, was not part of the merger.
In 1880, Gerald Waldo Hart formed the American Electric Company of New Britain, Connecticut, which merged a few years later with Thomson-Houston Electric Company, led by Charles Coffin. In 1887, Hart left to become superintendent of the Edison Electric Company of Kansas City, Missouri. General Electric was formed through the 1892 merger of Edison General Electric Company of New York, and Thomson-Houston Electric Company of Massachusetts, with the support of Drexel, Morgan & Co. Both plants continue to operate under the GE banner to this day.
During 1889, Thomas Edison had business interests in many electricity-related companies, including Edison Lamp Company, a lamp manufacturer in East Newark, New Jersey; Edison Machine Works, a manufacturer of dynamos and large electric motors in Schenectady, New York; Bergmann & Company, a manufacturer of electric lighting fixtures, sockets, and other electric lighting devices; and Edison Electric Light Company, the patent-holding company and the financial arm backed by J. P. Morgan and the Vanderbilt family for Edison’s lighting experiments.
In 1889, Drexel, Morgan & Co., a company founded by J.P. Morgan and Anthony J. Drexel, financed Edison’s research and helped merge those companies under one corporation to form Edison General Electric Company, which was incorporated in New York on April 24, 1889. The new company also acquired Sprague Electric Railway & Motor Company in the same year. The consolidation did not involve all of the companies established by Edison; notably, the Edison Illuminating Company, which would later become Consolidated Edison, was not part of the merger.
In 1880, Gerald Waldo Hart formed the American Electric Company of New Britain, Connecticut, which merged a few years later with Thomson-Houston Electric Company, led by Charles Coffin. In 1887, Hart left to become superintendent of the Edison Electric Company of Kansas City, Missouri. General Electric was formed through the 1892 merger of Edison General Electric Company of New York, and Thomson-Houston Electric Company of Massachusetts, with the support of Drexel, Morgan & Co. Both plants continue to operate under the GE banner to this day.

GE Inspira™ styles

Regular
Medium
Bold
Extra Bold
Regular Italic
Medium Italic
Bold Italic
Regular
Regular Italic
Medium
Medium Italic
Bold
Bold Italic
Extra Bold

Summary

Wolff Olins redesigned the GE brand identity and knew right away that creating a new corporate typeface would be an opportunity to produce something that would play a central role in expressing the brand in all its communications and experiences.

Inspira™ draws from the characteristics of the letters ‘G’ and ‘E’ inside the logo, which has largely remained the same since 1900. These details give GE Inspira its charm and make it a modern sibling to the lettering in the monogram. The design is simple with a friendly demeanor ideally suited for display type and GE’s unique product naming. As a result, it has become highly recognizable and contributes to the memorability of the GE brand. Designed in 2005.

In practice


Package design and images by Zwerner Office.

Credits & details